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Posts Tagged ‘linux

6 linux audio players that you may not heard of

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We are used with well-known music players such as amarok or rhythmbox. But what other options are out there? After a little research I made a list with six audio players for linux that are not very well known, but could replace some of the top players:

Ariado Player

ariado plazer

This software is a little music player allowing you to listen to music while being on a computer. Light and very portable, it runs on Linux, BSD, Mac and Windows download here …

.

Aqualung

aqualung

(my favorite from this list) Advanced music player for GNU/Linux, also running on FreeBSD, OpenBSD and Microsoft Windows. Plays audio CDs, internet radio streams, podcasts and soundfiles in just about any audio format and has the feature of inserting no gaps between adjacent tracks. download here …

Gimmix

gimmix

Graphical music player daemon (MPD) client written in C using GTK+2. Gimmix is very simple and easy to use, yet offers many features to make your audio experience a pleasant one. Gimmix main features are: Simple and Clean Interface; Compact and full view modes; Library Browser; Library search; Playlist management; ID3v2 Tag editing support; Support for controlling gimmix. download here …

MoreAmp

MoreAmp

Audio player, transcoder and cd ripper for Mac OS X, OS 9, Windows, Unix, and Linux. Plays and creates ogg, flac, mp3, aac, m4a, mp4, wav, and aif, and plays wma. 31-band equalizer, repeat loop, variable pitch/tempo, ram or ramdisk preload. download here …

reBMP

reBMPREturn of the Beep Media Player ! Key words: Linux, cue, ape, flac, lyrics. it bases on the beepmp-0.9.7.1, and i hacked some code, it now natively supports APE, FLAC with cuesheet list. Added a lyric panel to show lyrics when playing. Enjoy yourself mus. download here …

Sonic-Rainbow

SonicLinux GUI Multimedia Player that provides a CD Player, DVD Player, CD Ripper, Ogg Player, MP3 Player, CD Ripper, Sound Mixer, MP3 and Ogg file TAG editor enables the creation and modification of file TAGS. Utilises CDDB HTTP to download CD information and Tag Ogg and MP3 files as it rips them. Maintains CDDB information locally and displays it when playing CD’s. download here …

If you know other players that could be listed here, please comment …

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Written by nongeekboy

June 8, 2008 at 3:01 pm

How to decide if Ubuntu it’s for you?

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Here is a flowchart that I found on http://dl.getdropbox.com/u/29948/Ubuntuforyou.jpg that helps to decide if Ubuntu is a suitable Linux distro for you:flowchart

Written by nongeekboy

June 6, 2008 at 10:04 am

Posted in Ubuntu

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Four things you didn’t know about the “who” command

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Who is a very used command, and, as most of us know,  is a command to find out who’s working on your system.). But the who command can do much more then showing who is logged on. On his blog, Mike presents 4 options to use with who that “make it a great troubleshooting and statistics gathering command”.  These options are:

 

who –r  : Prints the current runlevel

who –b :  Prints the system boot time

who –t  : Prints out the last time the System Clock was changed

who –d : Prints out a list of all the dead processes on your system

 

Read the full article …

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Written by nongeekboy

May 27, 2008 at 7:07 am

apt-get … wife?!

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Linux can do all most anything for you. Here is the proof (found on www.lessaid.net) :

apt-get-wife

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Written by nongeekboy

May 26, 2008 at 8:05 am

Posted in fun

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How to easily install an application in Linux

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Many new linux users are very confused on how to actually install programs in Linux Distribution. It is true that installing new software in MS Windows is very easy. But in Linux is not only easy but very convenient. Why? In this post you will find the answer.
Let’s say that we need a photo managing software. In Windows we would search on internet after a suitable software and after finding one, we would download the package and install it. Now we will do the same thing in Linux. Let’s say that our linux distro is Ubuntu.

1.Will go to Applications -> Add/Remove and click on it:

Add/Remove Menu
2.In the Search box we will write what we are looking for, a “photo managing” application. Hit the Enter key.

Searchbox
3.Under the search box we have the applications which match our filter criteria. There is also a short description of each one of it.
4.Let’s say we would like to try F-Spot Photo Manager. Will check the corresponding box.Click on the “Apply Changes” button.

Selecting the application and starting the installation
5. We are ask to check our options. We want to install F-Spot so click the “Apply” button.

Confirm the installation
6.Linux is a very secured OS so, in order to install a application, the user password is required. Enter it and click the “OK” button.

Paswword request
7.We are anounced that the application has been installed. We don’t want to install anything else (yet) so we close the application

Close the application


This is not the only way to install a program in linux. Depending on the linux distribution you have, you could use another package manager (like yum, synaptic, etc.). Or you could use the faster method: the command line. If you know the name of the application you want to install, simply write:

nongeek@mma:~$ sudo apt-get install application_name

or (in fedora):

nongeek@mma:~# yum install application_name

That’s all. Easy, isn’t it?
Let’s list the benefits:
1.We didn’t search all over the internet. We have the most stable applications gathered in one place (called repository).
2.We installed the application with only one click (and a password).
3.We are not afraid of any malware.
I also recommend for reading what is (in my opinion) the best guide about installing applications in linux on the net: How to install ANYTHING in Ubuntu!

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Written by nongeekboy

May 2, 2008 at 2:01 pm

The Linux filesystem in simple words

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If you are new to Linux, one of the first things that, probably, dizzied you was that the linux filesystem is nothing like the one you were used in Windows. The first thing a new Linux user should understand is that while in Windows each partition/device is it’s own root (C: D: E:), in Linux every partition/device is mounted under the root directory (“/“) and it is represented as a sub-directory. The second thing the new user should understand is the purpose of each directory contained under the / (root directory). In order to help you familiarize with it, in the next section I gave a description of each part (directory) of the root system. Don’t worry, is not a complicated thing.

/ -root directory of your entire file system.

/bin/-executables needed during bootup, the shells, as well as most used commands (cp, mv, ls etc.) and other essential programs, shared by the system, the system administrator and the users.
/boot/-files used by the boot loader (the application that loads first when the computer is booted and if you have more than one OS on your computer, gives you the option to select one). Also stores the configuration files.
/dev/-device files. In Linux, hardware devices are represented as files with special properties (A file, as well as a hardware, can be read from and written to, isn’t it so?)
/etc/-system configuration file (similar to the data in the Control Panel in Windows)
/home/-personal directories for common users. This directory also contains the user specific settings (for different programs) and the customization files.
/lib/-shared libraries required by system programs (similar -somehow- to Windows DLL files). This directory also contains the kernel modules
/media/-mount point for removable media (usb, sticks, cdrom). Any device/partition mounted in this directory will have a shortcut on the desktop.
/mnt/-mount points for temporarily mounted filesystem (hdd partitions, network shares).
/opt/-optional applications (extra and third party software, add-on packages)
/sbin/-system administration as well as maintenance and hardware configuration programs (not intended for use by general users)
/srv/-data files for particular service provided by this system
/tmp/-temporary files. This directory is cleared out at reboot.
/usr/-multi-user shared binaries and files (utilities, applications, libraries, documentation etc.). Similar, somehow, to Windows Program Files
/var/-variable files (log files, the mail queue, the print spooler area)
/root/-personal (home) directory of the system administrator (root user)
/proc/-virtual file system containing information about system resources (tracks the state of the operating system kernel and the processes running on your computer)
You can find extended information about the Linux File System on the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard webpage.


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Written by nongeekboy

April 30, 2008 at 1:20 pm

Posted in general

Tagged with , , ,

My favourite linux music player

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Well, i’m not talking about Amarok, neither XMMS. Actually, i’m not even thinking of a GUI music player. I’m talking about mp3blaster. Mp3blaster is an interactive text-based Mp3 Player. So, if you are looking for the best Linux Mp3 Player you’re not on the right page. For a good list of choices, have a look at Binny’s Top 10 Linux MP3 Players. there you’ll find the right player for you.
Back to my player. Why in the world i’m using a text console based player? Hello!!! We are in the 21 century, you may say. That’s the point. This is the century of the applications that swallow all the CPU and memory available. The last thing I need is that a simple application, (like Audacious, my current GUI music player), to use a lot of my humble (computer) resources.

Mp3blaster works in a similar way to Xmms or WinAmp, there are play and stop buttons, the shuffle and repeat mode option and so on, as well as a menu-based playlist. It supports mp3, ogg, vorbis, wav, and sid audio files. Also it offers the possibility to divide a playlist into albums. There is also a simple mixer utility.

Mp3Blaster runing on terminal

The quick way to install it (in Ubuntu) :

nongeek@mma:~$ sudo apt-get install mp3blaster

You can always download the latest version from SourcefForge.net.
I use the player in the virtual console (CTRL-ALT-F1), so no matter what I do in the X session (e.g. logging out to change the user) the music it’s running and it’s costing me almost no resources.
By the way, what Mp3 Player do you use?

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Written by nongeekboy

April 20, 2008 at 3:00 pm

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