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Random notes on linux and web development

Archive for the ‘tutorials & howto’s’ Category

Google’s new favicon – what do you think?

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I’m sure that many of you noticed that Google has a new favicon. On their blog, you can find an anouncement aboutthis change. At the end of the article, the VP of the Search Products and User Experience department writes:

“We hope you like the new favicon, which nicely integrates all of our original criteria: distinctive in shape, noticeable, colorful, timeless, and scalable to other sizes.”

Google's favicons

Google's favicons

Well, I’m not an expert in design, but … it’s just me, or this new design is far away from Google’s “original criteria” as it is perceived by us, the users. Is’nt Google about simplicity, and eficienty? Think about their website. Can you describe it as being “colorful”? Is this somehow complex and color-packed favicon a fit symbol for Google? What do you think?

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Written by nongeekboy

January 10, 2009 at 11:55 am

Top 20 Linux websites

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I have compiled a list with the most useful websites about Linux (the distro specific sites are not included). They are great resources you can learn from or to find answer to your linux questions. These should be in any linux user bookmarks, so go ahead and look through these links and bookmark your favorite ones:

1)www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux

Provides information on Linux, Linux resources, and Linux development.

2)www.howtogeek.com

Includes help, tutorials, tips and how-to guides for Linux.

3)www.linuxquestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org offers a free Linux forum where Linux newbies can ask questions and Linux experts can offer advice. Topics include security, installation, networking and much more.

4)www.tldp.org

The Linux Documentation Project is working
towards developing free, high quality documentation for the Linux operating
system. The overall goal of the LDP is to collaborate in all of the issues
of Linux documentation.

5)www.linux.org

Comprehensive information and resources about the Linux Operating System.

6)www.linux.com

Our goal is to provide all the information necessary to make your use of Linux a success.

7)www.linuxforums.org

The Linux Software Resource, providing Linux Forums, Linux Server Distro info, Linux Training, Linux Help, Articles, Tutorials, News, Downloads and more!

Read the rest of this entry »

10 must-have Linux (and not only) cheat-sheets

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Need a quick reference card? Here you have a list you can choose from:

1.Linux Command Line Tips

This is a linux command line reference for common operations (HTML format).

2.Unix/Linux Reference Card

Linux Reference Card published on  FOSSwire website by Jacob. (PDF format)

3.One Page LInux Manual

A summary of useful Linux command by Squadron. (PDF format)

4.Linux Security Quick Reference

The intent of this Quick Reference Guide is to provide a starting point for improving the security of your system, to serve as a pointer to more in-depth security information, and to increase security awareness and methods that can be used to improve security. (PDF format)

5. Screen Cheat Sheet

This cheat sheet summarizes all they default keyboard mappings, with screen’s commands to execute the mapping and a description of each mapping. (PDF format)

6.Ubuntu Cheat Sheet 

There comes a time when one needs an end-all reference to the system. The time is now, and if you’re an Ubuntu user  you’ll like this cheat sheet. (PDF format)

7.VIM Graphical Cheat Sheet 

Probably the best Vim Cheat Sheet: “This is a single page describing the full vi/vim input model, the function of all keys, and all major features. You can see it as a compressed vi/vim manual. ” (GIF format)

Read more >> (Update: the link is down. I’m sorry)

Written by nongeekboy

August 23, 2008 at 8:31 pm

How to get system info in Linux

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Here are some useful commands that you can use to find (almost) every information that you want to know about your system from the command line. Most of this commands can be run as non-privileged user, but more information can be obtained if (and should be) run as root.:

linux_inside
General system information:
# uname -a
Process information:
# top

(Shift-M to order the list by memory use)

Memory information:
# free -m
BIOS information:
# dmidecode | less
Read more >>(UPDATE: The link is broken. Sorry)

 

Written by nongeekboy

August 18, 2008 at 9:10 am

How to backup your Windows in Linux

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I will show you how to make a fast backup of your windows partition from the command line. Of course, that is if you have enough space on your linux partition. Open a console and type the following command:

 

$ tar -cvzf win_backup.tar.gz /mnt/win

Where win_backup.tar.gz is the name of the archive and /mnt/win/  is the path to the windows partition (what to backup).

If there is a folder you don’t want to backup, use the exclude option. E.g.:

 

$ tar -cvzf win_backup.tar.gz --exclude= "/mnt/win/Downloads/*" /mnt/win

 

To restore do:

 

 $  tar -xvzf win_backup.tar.gz

 

Switch Explanation:
x -extract the contents of the TAR file
c -create a TAR file
z- uncompress it before extracting, used on file ending in .tar.gz or .tgz
v -verbose – display contents as it is tarring or extracting

f  -filename to follow


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Written by nongeekboy

June 2, 2008 at 10:17 am

How to lock the screen in GNOME

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I’m sure that many of you are used with the <Win>+<L> key combination in
windows, to lock the screen. In Ubuntu (the distro I use), the
corespondent shortcut is <CTRL>+<ALT>+<L>. But, in many other distros
there is no shortcut for this command. Here is what you can do to assign a shortcut for locking the screen. (In order to do that, you have to activate the Win key. Read “How to use the Win key in Linux” to find out how to do it.)
Open the gconf-editor by typing “gconf-editor” in the terminal.

nongeek@mma:~$ gconf-editor

Go to: apps>metacity>keybinding_commands

select keybindings-commnads

Read more>>



Written by nongeekboy

May 11, 2008 at 1:40 pm

How to easily install an application in Linux

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Many new linux users are very confused on how to actually install programs in Linux Distribution. It is true that installing new software in MS Windows is very easy. But in Linux is not only easy but very convenient. Why? In this post you will find the answer.
Let’s say that we need a photo managing software. In Windows we would search on internet after a suitable software and after finding one, we would download the package and install it. Now we will do the same thing in Linux. Let’s say that our linux distro is Ubuntu.

1.Will go to Applications -> Add/Remove and click on it:

Add/Remove Menu
2.In the Search box we will write what we are looking for, a “photo managing” application. Hit the Enter key.

Searchbox
3.Under the search box we have the applications which match our filter criteria. There is also a short description of each one of it.
4.Let’s say we would like to try F-Spot Photo Manager. Will check the corresponding box.Click on the “Apply Changes” button.

Selecting the application and starting the installation
5. We are ask to check our options. We want to install F-Spot so click the “Apply” button.

Confirm the installation
6.Linux is a very secured OS so, in order to install a application, the user password is required. Enter it and click the “OK” button.

Paswword request
7.We are anounced that the application has been installed. We don’t want to install anything else (yet) so we close the application

Close the application


This is not the only way to install a program in linux. Depending on the linux distribution you have, you could use another package manager (like yum, synaptic, etc.). Or you could use the faster method: the command line. If you know the name of the application you want to install, simply write:

nongeek@mma:~$ sudo apt-get install application_name

or (in fedora):

nongeek@mma:~# yum install application_name

That’s all. Easy, isn’t it?
Let’s list the benefits:
1.We didn’t search all over the internet. We have the most stable applications gathered in one place (called repository).
2.We installed the application with only one click (and a password).
3.We are not afraid of any malware.
I also recommend for reading what is (in my opinion) the best guide about installing applications in linux on the net: How to install ANYTHING in Ubuntu!

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Written by nongeekboy

May 2, 2008 at 2:01 pm

How to use the Window-keys in Linux (GNOME)

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If in Windows you were used with the Win key combinations, perhaps you would like to use it in Linux too. Here is a short tutorial about how to activate the Win keys in Linux.

First we will set the Windows key behaviour.

Go to System>Preferences>Keyboard.

Select Keyboard menu

Go to the Layouts tab and press the Layout Options button.

select the Layout Tab

Open the Alt/Win key option.

Alt/WIN

Select the “Super is mapped to the Win-keys” behaviour.

Select super mapped

Close the windows.

Now, that we have set the key behaviour, let’s make some Windows like shortcuts.

Go to System>Preferences>Keyboard Shortcuts.

Keyboard shortcut

Go to Window Management section.

Search for “Hide all windows and focus desktop”. Click on it.

<CTRL><ALT><D>

Now will change the default shortcut with the one we want. Press the <WIN><D> combination.

<WIN><D>

Close the window and test your new shortcut. It works?

Now you can use the Win-keys the same way as in Windows or create the combinations you like.

For a tutorial about locking the screen with <Win>L in other distros then Ubuntu read the “How to lock the screen in GNOME” article.

For a list of most used GNOME and Nautilus shortcuts read “Top 15 shortcut keys in gnome and  nautilus
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Written by nongeekboy

April 11, 2008 at 3:02 pm

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