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Archive for the ‘the power of console’ Category

Playing with CenterIM, a command line instant messenger

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When working in the terminal, I use a lot CenterIM, an instant messenger client. While Finch (Pidgin on ncurse) is more feature-rich than CenterIM and has almost all the plugins that Pidgin has, I prefer CenterIM because it has a very clean interface, offering you just what you need to communicate:

-a contact list

-a chat window

-a log window (I find it quite informative)

There is one function in Pidgin that I like a lot and that is  the “Pounce”  option (being announce with a pop-up when an user log off, log in or some other event you select).  After reading the   CenterIM Documentation, I found a very simple solution to implement this feature to my favorite command line IM client. So here it is: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by nongeekboy

November 29, 2010 at 4:21 pm

How to get system info in Linux

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Here are some useful commands that you can use to find (almost) every information that you want to know about your system from the command line. Most of this commands can be run as non-privileged user, but more information can be obtained if (and should be) run as root.:

linux_inside
General system information:
# uname -a
Process information:
# top

(Shift-M to order the list by memory use)

Memory information:
# free -m
BIOS information:
# dmidecode | less
Read more >>(UPDATE: The link is broken. Sorry)

 

Written by nongeekboy

August 18, 2008 at 9:10 am

How to backup your Windows in Linux

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I will show you how to make a fast backup of your windows partition from the command line. Of course, that is if you have enough space on your linux partition. Open a console and type the following command:

 

$ tar -cvzf win_backup.tar.gz /mnt/win

Where win_backup.tar.gz is the name of the archive and /mnt/win/  is the path to the windows partition (what to backup).

If there is a folder you don’t want to backup, use the exclude option. E.g.:

 

$ tar -cvzf win_backup.tar.gz --exclude= "/mnt/win/Downloads/*" /mnt/win

 

To restore do:

 

 $  tar -xvzf win_backup.tar.gz

 

Switch Explanation:
x -extract the contents of the TAR file
c -create a TAR file
z- uncompress it before extracting, used on file ending in .tar.gz or .tgz
v -verbose – display contents as it is tarring or extracting

f  -filename to follow


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Written by nongeekboy

June 2, 2008 at 10:17 am

Four things you didn’t know about the “who” command

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Who is a very used command, and, as most of us know,  is a command to find out who’s working on your system.). But the who command can do much more then showing who is logged on. On his blog, Mike presents 4 options to use with who that “make it a great troubleshooting and statistics gathering command”.  These options are:

 

who –r  : Prints the current runlevel

who –b :  Prints the system boot time

who –t  : Prints out the last time the System Clock was changed

who –d : Prints out a list of all the dead processes on your system

 

Read the full article …

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Written by nongeekboy

May 27, 2008 at 7:07 am

My favourite linux music player

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Well, i’m not talking about Amarok, neither XMMS. Actually, i’m not even thinking of a GUI music player. I’m talking about mp3blaster. Mp3blaster is an interactive text-based Mp3 Player. So, if you are looking for the best Linux Mp3 Player you’re not on the right page. For a good list of choices, have a look at Binny’s Top 10 Linux MP3 Players. there you’ll find the right player for you.
Back to my player. Why in the world i’m using a text console based player? Hello!!! We are in the 21 century, you may say. That’s the point. This is the century of the applications that swallow all the CPU and memory available. The last thing I need is that a simple application, (like Audacious, my current GUI music player), to use a lot of my humble (computer) resources.

Mp3blaster works in a similar way to Xmms or WinAmp, there are play and stop buttons, the shuffle and repeat mode option and so on, as well as a menu-based playlist. It supports mp3, ogg, vorbis, wav, and sid audio files. Also it offers the possibility to divide a playlist into albums. There is also a simple mixer utility.

Mp3Blaster runing on terminal

The quick way to install it (in Ubuntu) :

nongeek@mma:~$ sudo apt-get install mp3blaster

You can always download the latest version from SourcefForge.net.
I use the player in the virtual console (CTRL-ALT-F1), so no matter what I do in the X session (e.g. logging out to change the user) the music it’s running and it’s costing me almost no resources.
By the way, what Mp3 Player do you use?

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Written by nongeekboy

April 20, 2008 at 3:00 pm

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