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Archive for the ‘Ubuntu’ Category

Ubuntu 9.04 codename: Jaunty Jackalope

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As we approach the launch of Ubuntu 8.10, it’s time to create space for

future plans, and so I’m writing to introduce you to The Jaunty Jackalope.

Jaunty, the code name for what will most likely become Ubuntu 9.04, will

be the focus of our efforts from November through to April next year.

This is the message that Mark Shuttleworth sent it yesterday announcing the codename of the april 2009 Ubuntu release.
What are some of the major goals for these release? Mark stated:

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by nongeekboy

September 9, 2008 at 8:26 am

Posted in news, Ubuntu

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How to decide if Ubuntu it’s for you?

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Here is a flowchart that I found on http://dl.getdropbox.com/u/29948/Ubuntuforyou.jpg that helps to decide if Ubuntu is a suitable Linux distro for you:flowchart

Written by nongeekboy

June 6, 2008 at 10:04 am

Posted in Ubuntu

Tagged with , , ,

How to easily install an application in Linux

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Many new linux users are very confused on how to actually install programs in Linux Distribution. It is true that installing new software in MS Windows is very easy. But in Linux is not only easy but very convenient. Why? In this post you will find the answer.
Let’s say that we need a photo managing software. In Windows we would search on internet after a suitable software and after finding one, we would download the package and install it. Now we will do the same thing in Linux. Let’s say that our linux distro is Ubuntu.

1.Will go to Applications -> Add/Remove and click on it:

Add/Remove Menu
2.In the Search box we will write what we are looking for, a “photo managing” application. Hit the Enter key.

Searchbox
3.Under the search box we have the applications which match our filter criteria. There is also a short description of each one of it.
4.Let’s say we would like to try F-Spot Photo Manager. Will check the corresponding box.Click on the “Apply Changes” button.

Selecting the application and starting the installation
5. We are ask to check our options. We want to install F-Spot so click the “Apply” button.

Confirm the installation
6.Linux is a very secured OS so, in order to install a application, the user password is required. Enter it and click the “OK” button.

Paswword request
7.We are anounced that the application has been installed. We don’t want to install anything else (yet) so we close the application

Close the application


This is not the only way to install a program in linux. Depending on the linux distribution you have, you could use another package manager (like yum, synaptic, etc.). Or you could use the faster method: the command line. If you know the name of the application you want to install, simply write:

nongeek@mma:~$ sudo apt-get install application_name

or (in fedora):

nongeek@mma:~# yum install application_name

That’s all. Easy, isn’t it?
Let’s list the benefits:
1.We didn’t search all over the internet. We have the most stable applications gathered in one place (called repository).
2.We installed the application with only one click (and a password).
3.We are not afraid of any malware.
I also recommend for reading what is (in my opinion) the best guide about installing applications in linux on the net: How to install ANYTHING in Ubuntu!

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Written by nongeekboy

May 2, 2008 at 2:01 pm

How to use the Window-keys in Linux (GNOME)

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If in Windows you were used with the Win key combinations, perhaps you would like to use it in Linux too. Here is a short tutorial about how to activate the Win keys in Linux.

First we will set the Windows key behaviour.

Go to System>Preferences>Keyboard.

Select Keyboard menu

Go to the Layouts tab and press the Layout Options button.

select the Layout Tab

Open the Alt/Win key option.

Alt/WIN

Select the “Super is mapped to the Win-keys” behaviour.

Select super mapped

Close the windows.

Now, that we have set the key behaviour, let’s make some Windows like shortcuts.

Go to System>Preferences>Keyboard Shortcuts.

Keyboard shortcut

Go to Window Management section.

Search for “Hide all windows and focus desktop”. Click on it.

<CTRL><ALT><D>

Now will change the default shortcut with the one we want. Press the <WIN><D> combination.

<WIN><D>

Close the window and test your new shortcut. It works?

Now you can use the Win-keys the same way as in Windows or create the combinations you like.

For a tutorial about locking the screen with <Win>L in other distros then Ubuntu read the “How to lock the screen in GNOME” article.

For a list of most used GNOME and Nautilus shortcuts read “Top 15 shortcut keys in gnome and  nautilus
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Written by nongeekboy

April 11, 2008 at 3:02 pm

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